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5 Ways to Boost Your Security Against ID and Credit Card Theft

Securing your identity is a very important topic given some of the recent happenings in the news.  Having strong passwords to your online accounts is one of the most obvious ways to keep your online information safe and secure.  This article describes a few other, out of the box ideas to protect your security against ID and credit card theft. Consider looking into some of these options to see if they would work for you. If you have any questions or would like to discuss further, please contact our office at 610-651-2777.

 

Article By:  Bryan Mills

A week hardly passes without news of credit card and identity theft. Here are some security measures you can take, including some you’ve not likely heard of before now.

About a year ago, I was sitting down to dinner with my family when I got a phone call from a department store inquiring about my new credit card and recent purchases. I knew right away I had a problem because I’d never shopped at that store.

I left my dinner and started my own investigation. I spent dozens of hours tracking the frauds and thefts. I soon learned that five different credit cards had been opened in my name; new debit cards had been issued from my bank; and money had been transferred from my savings and checking accounts.

Naturally, I was completely appalled. Now I’m on a mission to make sure people learn from my experiences and consider putting into place new security measures, many of which I’d never known about—and I’m in the financial services business.

Here are five ways you can improve your protection against fraud:

1. Create secret “verbal passwords” on your bank and credit card accounts

Verbal passwords on all your bank and credit card accounts will save you time, money, sanity, and future chaos. Everyone enters a numbers-based key-code password when withdrawing money from a bank account at the ATM. Some, though not all, retail stores request an ID when you make a credit card purchase at the register. So why don’t banks require a password when you make a transaction at the teller?

Most banks won’t tell you to request a verbal password or phrase to be placed on your bank accounts. This is the most important thing you can do to protect yourself from the fraudsters lurking out there. Here’s how to do it:

Walk into your local bank and ask to speak with the branch manager. When you meet with the branch manager, request to speak about your accounts in a private office. Once you are in a closed office, instruct the branch manager to place a “verbal passcode” on all over-the-counter and phone request withdrawals, newly issued bank cards, and even transfers.

If the verbal password or phrase is not given, no information or transactions may proceed. I had this type of protection on one of my personal bank accounts. Unfortunately, I didn’t do this on the other one that was scammed for thousands of dollars in cash with a teller at a bank in a completely different state.

Most bankers don’t even check the signature card when given an over-the-counter withdrawal request. The verbal passcode or phrase will be your guardian and savior. One last thing: when you are asked to give your verbal password, never say your passcode or phrase out loud at the bank. Ask the teller for a piece of paper when asked for your passcode. Write it down, pass it to the teller and then take the paper back, tear it up, and put it in the trash.

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